Tag Archives: ministry

CALLED TO SERVE EVERYBODY: AN INTERVIEW WITH MICHAELO ABASORI, 2nd YEAR MDIV STUDENT by Carina Schiltz, Final Year MDiv Student

Wartburg’s campus has been enriched by the presence of international students for decades. Second year Michaelo Abasori, who is from Ethiopia, shares his passion about God’s work in the world and his own call to ministry.

“I am called to serve everybody,” Michaelo asserts. “I’ve been in ministry since I was young; I serve every people in every culture. God has called us to serve every people in every culture, the big, the small, the rich, the poor.”

Michaelo’s gifts and passion for ministry were recognized by others at an early age. At fourteen he began to take on leadership roles in his church, which was Lutheran. He lead choir, Bible studies, prayer, ministered to people, heard their stories, and worked on building community, bringing people together from different backgrounds, cultures, and languages.

As a child, his foundation of faith was built through attending church, Sunday school, confirmation, and hearing the pastors’ teachings. “I started to have faith in God, learning about people around me, [and] how to love people. That’s the foundation,” recalls Michaelo.

Did he always know one hundred per cent that he was called to being a pastor? He answers, “When I was young I had mixed feelings. I knew that I lived to serve the community [and] the church, but [at] the same time, I didn’t know that it was the right thing for me, so I struggled with that feeling. That’s how it starts. People liked what I did in the church, how I prayed with them, how I led worship or Bible study, and they said this is your gift, you’re going to make a good pastor, but I didn’t like it! I think everybody has that kind of feeling, right?” Michaelo laughs.

“Through time, through my struggle, I came to know that [this] is what God’s calling me to do, because I’ve seen that the ministry that we do in the church and in the community has great impact in the community and world [and it] is changing lives. So I decided there’s nothing better than this to do in my life. I committed myself to the call.” Michaelo was around 20 years old.

Michaelo’s commitment and call has led him to Wartburg Seminary. “When I came to United States, I was looking for a way in which I could serve the church of Christ,” recalls Michaelo. “Through prayers and through time, I knew God was guiding me through the Northeast Minnesota synod, by the support of brothers and sisters there.” Now, Michaelo is in his second year of seminary at Wartburg “to learn more and engage the gospel in the context of the culture.”

From Ethiopia to the US and beyond, Michaelo sees God at work and finds much hope in that. “God is not only working in this century; God is working from the beginning in every culture, in every society, all over the world. The hunger [and] the hope the church has right now—it’s great. There is hope for the church. God is working through them, through us, you know,” he nods.

Michaelo is encouraged by people’s response to the gospel. “God is working in people’s lives—in everybody’s life, that’s what I’ve seen. God is doing great things here in the US and other parts of the world.”

GOOD-BYE AND HELLO – TRUSTING GOD’S CALL By Michelle Kanzaki, Final Year M.Div.

Yes this is about my call and how God uses us in strange and unique ways.  I am not the typical seminary student. I am a 3rd or 4th career seminarian (depending on whose counting). I am old enough to be the grandmother of a 21-year-old and young enough to be the grandmother of children 4 and 6 years old. Since the beginning of this journey I knew the day would come when I would have to leave the safety of my home community. The place where I was born, grew-up, worked, had a child, enjoyed sisters and a brother, as well as cousins, aunts, uncles, and of course friends. I think you get the picture. This is the place where at my age, I thought I might finish my life, but God has other plans for me. Beautiful plans, glorious plans, but these plans were not chosen by me. Yet I am excited and delighted to look forward to new adventures and following God’s will for my life.

Yet at the same time, it is with a heavy heart I say “so long” to all those I love. It is not good-bye because you will always be treasured by me. We can still communicate via cell phones, skype, e-mails, letters, cards and in so many other ways. I can come back and visit and better still, you can come and visit me. Yes indeed, that would make my new home more like my old home. You know that in my warped sense of thinking I always thought that my daughter (my only child) would be the one to move away. And, had this been the case, although, it would have been hard for me, it would have been the natural order of things. But, no, God is sending me away from my child. Granted, if she is old enough to be the mother of a 21-year-old and a four and a six-year-old, she is plenty mature enough to live without her mom in a radius of less than 2 miles.

Now I want to say “Hello” to new friends. I look forward to getting to know you. I believe you have been praying for me and I know I am praying for you. I am trusting that you will tell me your cares, your fears, and joys. I am hoping you will allow me to be me and know that I am excited to be here. I want this change to be a long term change and I hope you do too. I am thanking God for giving me to you. May God’s will be done today tomorrow and forever.

BOOK REVIEW: ASH WEDNESDAY by Roberta Pierce, WTS, 2012

ASH WEDNESDAY
by Harold Eppley
Waverly, Tennessee: Oconee Spirit Press, 2012, 260 pages

Harold Eppley, a 1988 graduate of Wartburg Seminary has published seven non-fiction books, but this is his first novel. “Ash Wednesday” is the story of two pastors whose lives intersect in some very interesting ways. Both are struggling, but for very different reasons. Pastor Gerald Schwartz struggles with losing his wife to another woman, while trying to pacify a small church full of bickering people and still maintain his sense of liturgical correctness. Pastor Allan Weiss seems to have it all: a mega-church that affords him a luxurious lifestyle, a wife, children, and parishioners who adore him. Unfortunately, Pastor Weiss takes the adornment by some of his parishioners a bit too far, especially those who are young and attractive. In other words, he has no boundaries and, as long as his wife doesn’t find out, he is willing to have as many affairs as he can fit in to his busy schedule.

Although Schwartz and Weiss do not agree on many things, they are colleagues and when you live in a rural area, colleagues are not in great supply. They meet on a regular basis because the bishop mandated that each pastor in the district partner for a weekly meeting with a pastor whose approach to theology and ministry was different than theirs. This was a perfect match for those reasons.

At first, I was not sure I liked the portrayal of a pastor who jumped into bed with any attractive female who was willing or could be persuaded to have a sexual relationship with him. It was not the image of a pastor I want people to read about. That being said, I found Eppley’s writing sharp and page-turning. It was hard to put down. The book is full of satire and pathos. There are many sexual references in the book. It is definitely a book for adults only. What I found I enjoyed most about the book was Eppley’s way of intertwining the many colorful characters. He artfully captures the essence of each person and makes them come alive. I liked the ending. It was not what I expected, but it brought the book to a fitting conclusion for me.