Tag Archives: Prayer

ADVENT POEM By Will Layton, 2nd Year M.Div. Student

Prepare the way, O Zion! Ye awful deeps, rise high;
Sink low, ye lofty mountains, The Lord is drawing nigh.

The wise man in the pulpit says,
“This isn’t going to be easy.”
His white hair and his reputation for truth-telling
(A prophet, maybe?)
Make us all suspect he’s right.
Wars and rumors of wars,
Wars and rumors of wars.

That night, in a bar downtown, a woman sings:
“A change is gonna come.”
She sings as if she knows
The change will be right,
But we suspect it won’t be easy.
Wars and rumors of wars,
Wars and rumors of wars.

A young woman, expecting
Watches out the window,
As the streets of Detroit boil
Rebellion, riot, protest,
Change. Suspicion.
A people divided,
Uniformed bodies
And uninformed arms.
Her little boy—will be a month late–
Not easy, coming into a world like this.
Wars and rumors of wars,
Wars and rumors of wars.

On the too-familiar bench outside the courtroom,
Already suspect, easy to condemn,
Another one waits for judgment.
Something needs to change.
Wars and rumors of wars,
Wars and rumors of wars.

Beneath the throne, the saints cry out,
“How long, O Lord, how long?”
Do they think this will be easy?
Wars and rumors of wars,
Wars and rumors of wars.

These things must come to pass.

On the morning the stars fell,
It caught us off-guard.
We were all afraid,
So we all went outside together.
And as Jesus Christ passed by on the street,
We suspected things wouldn’t be easy,
But there was a rumor of peace.

PRAYERS OF INTERCESSION By Allie Hjerpe, first year M.Div.

3 AllSaints_1 photo

Candles lit surrounding the baptismal font by the community in remembrance during the service.

Prayers of Intercession given in Wartburg Chapel worship November 3, 2014 during All Saints Week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For those who are poor in spirit, those searching and yearning for the redemption of Immanuel, God with Us, that theirs is the Kingdom of God.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who mourn, those wounded reeling from anxiety, anger and grief, that they will be comforted in Christ walking with them and bearing their pain.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who are gentle, those caretakers and nurturers of our vulnerable resources, that they may bestow their loving protection on our earthly inheritance.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, those aching to live according to God’s will, that they may be filled with an abundance of God’s satiating grace and love.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who are merciful, those practicing compassion and forgiveness in the most challenging times, that they will experience God’s merciful presence.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who are pure in heart, those open and curious in their faith maturation, that they may ask enough questions to grow, but trust God in the challenge of their journey for sight.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who are the peacemakers, the advocates for peace and justice in the nations of the world, that they may be filled with authority and passion, and be known by their actions as children of God.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

For those who are persecuted because of righteousness, those who are oppressed, rejected and injured in Christ’s name, that theirs is God’s peace and the kingdom of heaven.

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

Into your mercy we commend ourselves, and for peace we pray, that all your creation may give you praise and worship, through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

CULTIVATING AN ATTITUDE OF GRATITUDE by Jon Brudvig, M.Div. Intern, Ellis, KS

Another season of giving thanks for the blessings in our lives calls to mind an old adage: “Don’t count your blessings; share them.” We reject a “me-first” ethic of scarcity in favor of an ethic of abundance, an outlook anchored in an attitude of gratitude. This outlook on life is reflected in the psalmist’s confidence in God’s abundance: “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want” (Psalm 23:1), a deeply intimate and comforting expression of God’s abundant blessings, abundant love, goodness, and mercy that overflows into every area of our lives. This renders powerless the things of this world that we fear the most: death, enemies, and scarcity.

Robert Ketchum writes about this in his book, I Shall Not Want (a story recounted by Tim Hansel in Stories for the Family’s Heart). An ethic of abundance is succinctly communicated through a perceptive child: A young girl confidently responded to her Sunday school teacher’s invitation to recite Psalm 23 from memory. Although the teacher doubted the child’s ability to recite the entire psalm, the teacher encouraged the brave young student to come forward. After she had made her way to the front of the classroom, she proclaimed: “The Lord is my shepherd, that’s all I want.”

This ethic of abundance serves as a powerful antidote to the constant barrage of messages crafted to tell us the things we want: glitzy gadgets and newfangled gizmos seductively marketed to deceive us into believing they will satisfy the deepest longings of the human heart. Yet, like the prophetic four-year-old, individuals who approach life with an ethic of abundance gladly share their blessings with others. Individuals who cultivate the habit of giving thanks for the blessings in their lives are givers. They are able to look beyond themselves and to respond in gracious giving to neighbors in need; sharing gifts of their time, talents, and resources to organizations in need of donations and volunteers.

“Don’t count your blessings, share them” challenges us to approach life with an abundance mentality, an approach to thankful living in which practitioners generously give of their time, talents, and energies for the building up of Christ’s church on earth. This outlook is grounded in the belief, “The Lord is my Shepherd, that’s all I want.”

INTERCESSORY PRAYERS FOR IMMIGRANT LABORERS by Rev. Minna Quint, WTS 2014, Capital Hill Lutheran, Des Moines, IA

For hands that work all day and night on property they will never own
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

For backs that are twisted and bent working in fields that just go on and on
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

For fingers that are red and swollen from picking a harvest they will never consume
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

For shoulders that carry burdens which reside in their muscles leaving knots that cannot be untied
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

For brows burning in the heat of an unforgiving sun begging for a single cloud
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

For knees that ache so heavily night after night they prevent any chance of sleep
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

For ears that refuse to listen and turn away another’s plea
For eyes that choose dominion over every creature they see
For minds that cannot understand what it means to have equality
Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer

Prayers for Sexual Assault Awareness at Wartburg Seminary by Mary Wiggins, 2nd Year M.Div

The community of Wartburg Seminary, during the week of April 25th 2013, prayed for those impacted by Sexual Assault. April is Sexual Assault Awareness month. This effort was coordinated by the Global Concerns Committee and the Chapel Staff and planning groups. Although Sexual Assault and Abuse primarily affect women, it does not discriminate for men and women, young and old from all over the world are survivors of rape, incest, and abuse. It is estimated that 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men are impacted by sexual assault in their life time.  

What makes sexual abuse so vile? Its power to isolate and to silence.

Fifty-eight candles were lit in the chapel to represent how sexual abuse statistics would look in a community of Wartburg’s size. These candles were accompanied by prayers for victims–survivors and those who did not survive, supporters, advocates and perpetrators. With sighs too deep for words to express these candles were a visual prayer for all the people whose voices were silenced by abuse.

Image of candles on the Table in Loehe Chapel.

Holy One, you do not distance yourself from the pain of your people, but in Jesus you bear that pain with all who suffer at other’s hands. With your cleansing love bring healing and strength to victims of sexual assault and by your justice, lift them up, that in body, mind, spirit they may again rejoice. In Jesus name, Amen.” (Evangelical Lutheran Worship, p. 84)

Photo credit: Mary Wiggins

SACRED SPACE by Rita Augsburger, M.Div. senior

The Lord speaks to us in many and varied ways. At times this voice may be a thought or a quiet, persistent pulse that continues to oscillate in intensity until it is addressed in some concrete way. Sometimes the persistent voice calls to engage with others and something new is created. Barb Otten is a member of St John’s Lutheran Church in Sterling, IL., and a junior at WTS. She had completed a two year program of Spiritual Formation and was feeling the persistent pulse to share, with her congregation, what she had learned about spiritual practices.

When I came on internship at St. John’s in the late summer of 2010, Barb mentioned this desire to me. Within moments we had a plan and a schedule to run by the pastor. Sacred Spaces, a five week Lenten series on Spiritual practices —Mandella, Stretch-N-Pray, Praying in Color, Lutheran Prayer Beads, and the Labyrinth—became the concrete way of addressing the persistent pulse.

Evolving out of this series, and another community event, a group of congregation members felt the need to create a place for people to go to pray, read scripture, contemplate, and meditate. The East Room of St John’s, formerly just a pass through, was a perfect choice. This room has now become a Sacred Space for spiritual refreshment.

From one pulse to another to others, the work of the Spirit carries on.